The Best Methods Used For Testing Apps

Nigel Tsopo
09 September 2022
7 min read

It's no secret that when you're developing an application, the software testing process is essential for ensuring that what you release to the general public is of good quality.

In this post, we'll explore different methods used for testing apps and other key considerations relating to testing methodology.

5 Reasons Why App Testing Is Important

There are several crucial reasons why app testing should be carried out:

  1. To ensure that the app functions as intended and is devoid of glitches and errors.

  2. To check for compatibility issues on different devices and operating systems.

  3. To see to a positive and seamless user experience.

  4. To ensure that the app is secure, data is protected and is compliant with any relevant regulations.

  5. To verify that new features or updates function as intended.

Together, these factors underscore the importance of app testing for both developers and users alike.

Having comprehensive testing methods in your arsenal helps identify potential problems early on, which will ultimately save the development process time and money.

With so much at stake, then, it’s essential you work with a professional app testing company that can provide comprehensive testing services. At Startup House, we have the experience and expertise to ensure that your app is thoroughly tested and ready for launch.

Functional vs Non-functional App Software Testing

In the software development process, there are two main types of testing that must be considered – functional and non-functional testing.

Both are important in their own way, and each has its unique benefits and drawbacks.

Functional Testing

Functional testing is primarily concerned with the functionality of the software being developed. That is, does the software do what it's supposed to do?

This type of testing usually involves writing test cases which exercise all software features to ensure they're functioning as intended.

Functional testing can be performed manually or using automated tools.

Non-functional Testing

As the name indicates, this is primarily concerned with the non-functional aspects of the software being developed.

These aspects include performance, scalability and security. Like functional testing, non-functional testing can be performed manually or using automated tools.

So, which type of testing is right for your project? This depends on a number of factors, including the nature of the project, the resources available, and the preferences of the development team.

However, it's generally a good idea to use both functional and non-functional testing throughout the development process as this ensures the software meets all necessary requirements and functions as intended.

Qualitative Vs Quantitative App Testing

Quantitative Testing

Quantitative testing is all about numbers and data. Quantitative testers measure things like performance, speed and reliability, and thereby help identify areas that are in need of improvement.

However, quantitative testing can also be a time-consuming and expensive process.

Qualitative Testing

Qualitative testing is more focused on user experience (UX). This type of testing is frequently used to assess product usability and user satisfaction.

Manual vs Automated Software Testing

Manual Testing

Manual testing is where the tester executes the test cases without the use of any automation tools. It can be used for functional or non-functional testing.

Manual testing identifies defects that cannot be found by automated methods and it is usually conducted by actual system users rather than by the development team.

Our previous blog posts on how to do user testing in 3 simple steps can provide more insight into manual testing.

Automated Testing

As indicated, automated testing is where the tester employs automation tools for executing test cases. It can be used for functional or non-functional testing.

The goal of automated testing is to find defects that cannot be found by manual tests and it is usually conducted by a development team.

Most Common Methods For Testing Apps Explained

  1. UX Testing

  2. Unit Testing

  3. Integration Testing

  4. System Testing

  5. Acceptance Testing

  6. Performance Testing

  7. Scalability Testing

  8. Load Testing

  9. Security Testing

  10. Compatibility Testing

  11. Regression Testing

  12. Exploratory Testing

  13. Black Box Testing

  14. User Experience Testing

UX Testing

User experience testing is a method for evaluating the ease and effectiveness of a user's interaction with a particular system, product or service.

This can be done through surveys, interviews, focus groups and usability testing.

UX research is a field of inquiry that seeks to understand user needs and preferences in order to design better products and services and is a crucial part of any product development process.

Unit Testing

Unit testing is a type of functional testing that focuses on the smallest testable unit of code, typically a single method or function.

The goal of unit testing is to ensure that this unit of code behaves as expected.

Integration Testing

Integration testing is a type of functional testing that focuses on testing the interactions between different units of code.

The goal of integration testing is to ensure that these units of code work together as intended.

Integration tests are usually written by the development team and run automatically during the build process.

System Testing

System testing is a type of functional testing that focuses on the behavior of the system as a whole.

The goal of system testing is to ensure that the system meets all requirements and functions as intended.

Acceptance Testing

Acceptance testing is a form of functional testing that determines whether or not the system meets the acceptance criteria set forth by the customer or client. As such, it confirms that the system is or is not fit for use.

Performance Testing

Performance testing focuses on the performance of the system under load.

When performance tests are run effectively, systems can handle the expected amount of traffic and data without adversely affecting the user experience.

Scalability Testing

Scalability testing is a type of non-functional testing that focuses on the ability of the system to scale up or down as required.

The goal of scalability testing is to ensure that the system can handle increasing levels of traffic and data without adversely affecting the user experience.

Load Testing

Load testing is a type of non-functional testing that also focuses on the ability of a system to handle increasing levels of traffic and data without adversely affecting the user experience.

Security Testing

Security testing is a type of non-functional testing that focuses on the security of the system.

The goal of security testing is to ensure that the system is secure from potential threats and vulnerabilities.

Compatibility Testing

Compatibility testing is a type of non-functional testing that focuses on the compatibility of the system with different devices, browsers and operating systems.

The goal of compatibility testing is to ensure that the system can be used on all intended devices and platforms without any issues.

Compatibility tests are usually conducted by actual users of the system, rather than by the development team.

Regression Testing

Regression testing is a type of testing that is conducted after changes have been made to the system to ensure that these changes did not introduce any new defects.

Regression testing can be used for functional or non-functional testing.

The goal of regression testing is to ensure that the changes made to the system did not break any existing functionality.

Regression tests are usually conducted by the development team.

Exploratory Testing

Exploratory testing is a type of testing where the tester does not follow any specific test cases but instead explores the system to find defects.

It can be used for functional or non-functional testing.

The goal of this type of testing is to find as many defects as possible in the shortest amount of time, and it is usually conducted by actual users of the system rather than by the development team.

Black Box Testing

Black box app testing is a process of testing an application from the outside, without any knowledge of its internal workings.

This type of testing is often used to test user interfaces and other external aspects of an application. A black box testing method can be used to find bugs and problems with an application's functionality.

It is also often used to test the usability of an application.

Conclusion

Thanks for reading! We hope this article has underlined the importance of mobile app testing. It's an importance that cannot be overstated – particularly when you consider how users are increasingly reliant on mobile devices for everything from entertainment to communication.

Thorough testing is indispensable when you're looking to provide the best possible UX for your customers whilst avoiding costly issues that could pop up later on.

So, with so much at stake, it’s essential you work with a professional app-testing team who can provide comprehensive testing services.

At Startup House, we have the experience and expertise to ensure that your app is thoroughly tested and ready for launch. Contact us today to learn more about our services.

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